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Food for Inspiration

As an amateur travel and landscape photographer, I’m always looking for inspiration for my next shot or location. since I started taking photos, there have been many people who have steered me towards the path I am on now and I am sure that there will be many more people who inspire me along the way. As of right now, there are the people that I admire the most and their Instagram handles, in no particular order. I should also make it clear that none of the photos in this post are my own and they belong to the stated owners.

Elia Locardi (@elialocardi)

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Elia Locardi is someone I found out about when I was browsing the web for photography tutorials and came across the first installment of his Photographing The World collaboration with FStoppers. In his tutorial, he was extremely knowledgeable and showed every step of his workflow and process. Photographing The World is available through the FStoppers website and includes 12+ hours of instructional content in many different countries including Iceland, New Zealand, and much more (I’m starting to sound like an advertisement right?). For about $300, this tutorial is a bit pricey but it’s well worth it just from the first episode (available for free on the FStoppers Youtube channel).

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The thing that I admire the most about Elia Locardi is that he has devoted every second of his life to travel photography, and I mean that in a very literal sense. By this, I mean he is 100% location independent (basically homeless) and lives out of hotel rooms and travels full time, making money from photography tours, speaking at events, and collaborations with esteemed photography communities and entities such as FStoppers. He exemplifies the very lifestyle that I hope to live in the future. For some more of his work and his upcoming events and photo tours, check out his website: Blamethemonkey.com

Jacob Moon (@moonmountainman)

As an avid hiker, I’ve admired Jacob Moon’s work for a while. What I love about Jacob’s work is that he captures natural beauty incredibly well, but I mostly admire his portraits of lone adventurers conquering incredible landscapes, showing harmony between man and nature.

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As a somewhat amateur mountaineer, I often find myself trying to emulate Jacob Moon’s portrait compositions and show man admiring the unaltered beauty of nature. While I haven’t spent much time climbing and mountaineering, I always try to take a self portrait like the one above at each location I go to photograph.

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Peter Lik (@Peterlik)

A few months ago, when I was visiting Las Vegas, I was strolling around the shops in Caesar’s Palace and happened upon on of Peter Lik’s galleries. In it, I was bombarded by beautiful panoramas of the milky way, antelope canyon, and many more visually stunning images. While Peter Lik’s photographs are incredible, I must admit that his photography isn’t what I admire most about him.

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The thing that I admire the most about him is the way he approaches his photography business. While some may consider his work and the way he goes about selling his work a “scheme”, I see it simply as clever marketing. See, Peter Lik prints a limited number of each of his images. The first images sell for around $4000 each and as the supply dwindles, the prices go up. The thing that causes the most controversy is the fact that he prices his work as “fine art” and sells it accordingly, most in the art world would say that his photos have no artistic merit. One of the things that I admire most is the fact that he has streamlined his printmaking process down from a month to just a few days, about a week, turning his print selling business to what is essentially a small corporation selling beautiful landscape photos. To date, he is the highest grossing photographer (grossing about $400 million) of all time and currently holds the world record for the highest price paid for a photograph ($6 million for a one-off print of “Phantom”).

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Hopefully, after reading this article, you’ll be inspired to go follow some more photographers and draw cues from their work to improve yours, because I know I will.

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